Cancer-Causing Carcinogens

Post at least one substantial response post, utilizing at least one outside source and at least one class resource (textbook, class articles, etc.). Posts should be at least fully developed paragraphs and should thoughtfully reflect on, critique, or expand upon the post that you are responding to. Remember that “You did a good job!” posts will not receive any credit. The goal is to get a dialogue going with your classmates. You may respond to any posts in the thread, but avoid responding directly to the original topic if several students have already done so. If you see an engaging discussion that has started, feel free to join in and add your input. When I took statistics, it was clear that a quantitative analysis of a data set could be altered based on the perspective of the study and the regulations that were set forth. I oftentimes question studies that are shown on the news and ask myself what if. What if the study in regards to coffee being a cancer-causing carcinogen was skewed based on asking simple questions on a questionnaire that nearly aimed towards making coffee out to be the culprit? Is this study reliable? A few weeks prior, another study was on the same news station claiming that black coffee assisted in the prevention of the growth of cancer. When researching reliability in our textbook, it became clear that “reliability involves a replication” of a given study in order to “evaluate” it’s strength and validity (Polit & Beck, 2018, p. 175). It then became clear to me that in order for a given study to be reliable, the given study must be done on numerous occasions and be unchanged in its outcome. The outcome must remain consistent. Consistency is the only true form of reliability. If studies such as the one mentioned above are in fact reliable, then what are the founding variables of the study? Variables can change from one study to the next which almost always leaves me guessing what could tweak the numbers and make the outcome out to be inconsistent with other similar studies. I’ll leave the explanation of the different kinds of variables to someone else, but I firmly believe it is important to recognize that variables must be measurable. I read an article that brought forth a great point. It explained, “imagine trying to do an experiment where one of the variables is love” (Science Buddies, 2019, par. 6). You cannot measure love on a meter or a scale. Love is subjective and it is a dependent variable that can be subsequently altered by other emotions or actions. So, how can we measure indefinitely that cancer in patients was caused by coffee when we know indefinitely that these people have consumed so many other dependent factors that could have altered the outcome? reliability of a study is founded on studies given variables.

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