Talking Point Presentation

. Preparation requires having done the readings, thought about it carefully, and written down your thoughts. To that end, you are asked to produce “talking points” and post them to Compass for each set of weekly readings (300 words maximum). I want to see what you’re thinking. You should stake out arguments or raise issues that you believe arise from your engagement with the assigned readings. This means you should be integrating ideas from most, if not all, of the readings. The goal is NOT to provide a synopsis or even an evaluation of the readings. Rather, you should communicate your own ideas and arguments that were prompted by the readings. If you don’t have your own ideas or arguments, try harder. When you’re making an argument, here’s something to keep in mind: Brockriede states that the argument implies five characteristics: “(1) an inferential leap from existing beliefs to the adoption of a new belief or reinforcement of an old one; (2) a perceived rationale to justify that leap; (3) a choice among two or more competing claims; (4) regulation of uncertainty in relation to the selected claim—since someone has made an inferential leap, certainty can be neither zero nor total; and (5) a willingness to risk a confrontation of that claim with one’s peers.” At the end of your “talking points,” list (at least) three discussion questions that you like to share with the class. Those questions will be selectively used in the class by the instructor or the assigned discussants.  Grade Criteria for ‘Talking Points’ Assignments I will grade these assignments using a 1 to 3 scale basis. Here’s a brief qualitative description of what these scores represent to me: 3: “Exceptional” A thorough knowledge of the materials: An excellent response written in a clear and concise way, and few, if any errors of fact or writing, and well-written essay with multiple examples. 3 2: “Satisfactory” Some care and expression of knowledge: A clear, understandable written style; perhaps a few errors of fact or writing. The discussion needs more clarity, more development, and/or examples. The essay is missing some of the subtleties of the argument. 1: “Unsatisfactory” A substandard adequate completion of the assignment; superficial response with few examples; discussion or argument is unsubstantiated; sources are poorly cited; many errors of fact; inadequate writing and grammar.

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