The Principal and Ethical Behavior

As we think about the importance of a person being set apart to accomplish a public purpose such as a principal, teacher, doctor, accountant, policeman, and etc., we would do well to keep in mind that good ethical behavior is a leadership must. In fact, we don’t look kindly on the exceptions. Perhaps this is because we depend on others to abide rules of good ethical behavior just as they depend on us. Most of us do not violate rules of good behavior or ignore laws or public policy set forth to help assure that we may enjoy a safe orderly society. While we may reserve the right to grouse about rules, policy or the law few of us knowingly seek to evade our responsibilities.  We trust. We trust our neighbor, accountant, banker, attorney and the pilot of our plane. Experience may make us cautious concerning human failure and those exceptions when our trust might have been shaken. But that is the point: these are exceptions. When taking on the role of school leadership, we become something more than ourselves. We carry the dreams and the hopes people have for our children.  This is worth keeping in mind as we prepare and work toward providing effective leadership in our school, community and nation. The bottom line is: As a principal we must be fully committed to setting and demonstrating high standards of ethical behavior in our school and community.   Answer the following questions: How effective is the leadership in your school with regard to setting and abiding high standards of ethical behavior for all concerned?  What role does ethical behavior play in garnering public trust, and support for the school? What could you do to help assure that others view you as a model for good ethical behavior?  What questions, concerns, or ideas do you have regarding leadership and ethics? Kemerer, F.R. & Crain, J.A. (2016) Texas documentation handbook: Appraisal, nonrenewal, termination. Austin, TX: Texas School Administrators Legal Digest. (W4LO1, W4LO 2, CLO2, CLO3, CLO 6) – Read Chapters: 2,4 and Appendix C. Marshall, K. (2013). Rethinking teacher supervision and evaluation: How to work smart, build collaboration, and close the achievement gap. San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons.- Read Intro and Chapter 2,3,4, 5 and Appendix A.

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